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Fostering Creativity with Acupuncture

by in Acupuncture February 4, 2012

Many people know that Acupuncture can treat physical pain, but few people are aware of it’s potential to foster dynamic creativity and healthy expression.  As a Five Element practitioner, my goal is to engender the proper movement of the elements as they show up in each individual.  In my initial series of treatments I address blockages that I see in each person that may be preventing them from healthy movement.

A recent patient with a main complaint of anxiety reported, after seven treatments, that she had finally gotten over her crippling writer’s block of several years.  She attributed the new movement to the renewed sense of well-being and groundedness she experienced with regular Acupuncture treatments.  For now receives monthly sessions for maintenance.

Typically, patients come in for treatment because they are experiencing stagnation or a blockage, which manifests as headaches, digestive issues, or physical pain.  The Five Element tradition is unique in that it allows not only for physical healing, but also addresses long-held emotional or mental burden that may encumber the free expression of one’s spirit.  Time and again patients report not only an experience of renewed wellness but a sense of “coming home” to one’s self.  Whatever your goals and aspirations, Acupuncture can help create a clearer vessel for their expression.

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MaryFatimah Weening, L.Ac., Dipl.Ac.

MaryFatimah has practiced acupuncture for eight years, and is licensed by the Pennsylvania State Board of Medicine, and nationally board-certified by the NCCAOM. She holds a B.A. from Smith College, and a Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine from Maryland University of Integrative Health.
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About MaryFatimah Weening, L.Ac., Dipl.Ac.
MaryFatimah has practiced acupuncture for eight years, and is licensed by the Pennsylvania State Board of Medicine, and nationally board-certified by the NCCAOM. She holds a B.A. from Smith College, and a Master of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine from Maryland University of Integrative Health.

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